Consumer Disclosures- 2023

Governing Body

Beis Midrash of Queens, Inc.

Beis Midrash of Queens is a registered 501c3 non-profit charitable and educational organization, founded in 1982 by Rabbi Dr. Harold J. Reichman.

Religious Identity Statement
Disclosure Statement

Admissions Policy

Program Offerings

Degree Type Program Title Delivery
Associate Degree Software and Web Development Online
Bachelor Degree Computer Programming and Technology Online
Bachelor Degree Judaic Studies Online

Refund Schedule: Summer Term

Refund Calculation Example – Summer

$900 Paid in Tuition

Refund Schedule: Fall and Spring Terms

Refund Calculation Example – Fall and Spring

$900 Paid in Tuition

Sample Enrollment Agreement

Sample Payment Agreement

Discrimination, Hazing, and Assault Policy

  • The school supports federal and state laws which prohibit discrimination against any person because of race, color, creed, religion, national origin, age, sex, disability, marital status, or status with regard to public assistance.
  • The school prohibits and will not tolerate discriminatory practices, harassment, hazing or assault of anyone connected to the school’s community.
  • Sexual harassment of employees is prohibited under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act. Sexual harassment of students is prohibited under Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972.
    Assault is the commission of an act with the intent to cause fear in another or immediate bodily harm or death, or the intentional infliction or attempt to inflict bodily harm upon another. Sexual assault is forced sexual activity without the expressed consent of both parties.
Distance Education Disclosure
Language Disclosure

Woodmont College is a degree-granting institution, licensed through the Florida Department of Education Commission for Independent Education. The college offers all coursework via online offerings. Students log in to the college’s Learning Management System regularly to perform learning activities including watching videos, reading online resources, textbook reading, and interactive assignments. Regular contact with course instructors takes place via web meeting, email, and phone.

All courses offered at Woodmont College are taught in English. Some Judaic Studies courses above a 200 level require a degree of comfort with reading and understanding basic Hebrew. Students studying towards a degree in Judaic Studies must take a placement exam which will assess their knowledge of Hebrew and Judaic textual skill level. Some students will be required to take Hebrew I and II in order to enroll in higher level Judaic Courses.

Course Numbering System

The first number indicates the grade level for the course and the last number indicates which semester one can expect the course to be offered. Courses that are part of a sequence usually have a 1 or a 2 as the third number and courses that are not part of a sequence often have a 0 to indicate that they may be offered equally between semesters. The second number identifies that course. Sequences generally have the same middle number but different end numbers. Those with higher middle numbers often indicate electives.

Course Enrollment and Withdrawal Policy

The Woodmont College Academic Calendar notes latest dates for students to withdraw from a course with or without a W. Enrollment in courses should take place one week before semester start; the last date a student can enroll in a course is the final date for Withdrawal with a W.

Grading System

Woodmont College uses the following grading scale:

A 94-100 4.0 Exceptional work
A- 90-93 3.7 Excellent
B+ 87-89 3.5 Very good
B 83-86 3.0 Meets expectations
B- 80-82 2.7 Average
C+ 77-79 2.5 Average
C 70-76 2.0 Average
D+ 67-69 1.3 Must retake course
D 63-66 1.0 Must retake course
D- 60-62 0.7 Must retake course
F Below 60 0.0 Failing

 

Students earning below a C must retake the class. If a student retakes a class, the full tuition will be assessed. All assignments are graded using standard grading rubrics.

Assignment Submission Policy
Student Late Work Policy
Incomplete Grade Policy

All assigned coursework should be submitted in the format outlined, unless the student has received prior approval. This includes but is not limited to forum postings, projects, and instructor emails. Each assignment has a due date to guide students in successful course completion. Any assignments submitted after that time will be considered late, as established by the Student Late Work Policy. Once an assignment is considered late it may be subject to partial credit or in some cases not accepted, as determined by the course instructor. All assignments should be submitted prior to the end of course date. If a student feels they will not be able to complete all assignments within that time frame, he / she may elect to take an incomplete in the course. For information on petitioning to receive an incomplete grade, refer to the Incomplete Grade Policy.

Instructors have the option to modify the Woodmont College Assignment Submission policy. If an instructor selects to modify the Woodmont College Assignment Submission policy, the instructor is required to inform students of the policy during the first week of class. The student late work policy of the instructor should be followed in all cases. This default late work policy is as follows:

Faculty and staff of Woodmont College realize that emergencies do occur. If a student knows that he/she will be unable to complete an assignment by the due date, he/she is to contact the instructor PRIOR to the due date. Early contact is best, as plans can be made to keep the student from falling behind, and ensure the highest possible grade. Without a prior emailed extension from the instructor, late work will be accepted up to one week after the due date for partial credit.

Students have the opportunity to petition to receive an incomplete grade if they are unable to complete course assignments by the end of the semester. To petition, students and faculty members review the assignments that are outstanding and the last date the student would be allowed to submit the assignments. The faculty member and student sign the Incomplete Grade Form (Appendix B) stating the details and the faculty member submits the form to the Registrar. Incomplete grades should be given only if students have a chance to complete the work within two weeks of the course end date. If work is not submitted two weeks after the end of the semester, then the teacher must contact the student to work out a plan for completing the work. All work must be submitted by the end of the following semester. Failure to do so changes the Incomplete to a Failing grade.

Unit of Credit

Woodmont College offers all degree programs on a semester credit hour basis with one contact hour equivalent to 15 lecture, 30 laboratory, and 45 externship hours. The credit measure is based upon outcomes of the course, not time input, with monitoring of time logged into a class, including streaming or downloading videos and/or working on tests and quizzes. A semester is defined as sixteen weeks of instruction, learning experience, and out of class assignments.

The following table outlines the number of credits required for graduation from each program offered at Woodmont College:

Program General Education Credits Required Major Credits Elective Credits Total Credits
Software and Development 15 24 21 60
Computer Programming and Technology 30 33 57 120
Judaic Studies 45 30 or 43 45 or 32 120

 

Standards for Satisfactory Progress in a Course

The minimum standards considered for satisfactory progress in a course or program for credit earned and to graduate are:

  • Eighty percent (80%) participation in online discussion board
  • Completion of all tests and assignments at 70% or better
  • Final grades and student evaluations are issued at the end of each semester
  • A student must maintain a CGPA of 2.0

Proctored Exams

Many courses culminate with a final exam, which is proctored using ProctorU, an online proctoring service. The ProctorU service is modeled after the in-classroom experience. ProctorU uses specific protocol for identity validation, including having students show an official ID.

ProctorU proctors monitor the students through audio and video connections and employ screen-sharing technology that allows the proctor to view the student’s computer screen during the exam session.
 
Proctored exams are spread out within the program, with some lower level and some upper level courses requiring proctored exams. This ensures that students throughout the program will be properly identified. Standard general education courses such as algebra, introductory technology courses, and social science courses also require proctored exams. Many courses that require a final require students to complete the final exam with ProctorU. 

Standards for Satisfactory Progress in a Program

Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) is a tool that is used to evaluate whether students are progressing in their programs and are on track to graduate in a reasonable timeframe. Both qualitative and quantitative standards are used to evaluate student progress. SAP contains three elements : Cumulative Grade Point Average, Completion Ratio, and Maximum Time Frame.

1

Cumulative Grade Point Average (Qualitative Standard)

Undergraduate students maintain a cumulative grade point average of 2.0. Graduate students maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3.0.

2

Completion Ratio (Quantitative Standard)

Students pass 2/3 of credit hours attempted. In other words, students pass 67% of courses attempted. This is calculated by dividing cumulative hours of credits completed successfully by cumulative hours of credits attempted.

3

Maximum Time Frame

Students are within SAP as long as they are on pace to complete the degree within 150% of the maximum time frame.  Time frame refers to the number of attempted credit hours. For an associate degree, that is a maximum of 90 credit hours. For a bachelor’s degree, that is 180 credit hours, and for a master’s degree, that is 54 credit hours.  That means that if a student attempted 100 credit hours for a bachelor’s degree, yet has 90 credit hours remaining to complete his degree, he is officially out of SAP. 

Each of these components is integral to SAP. If a student does not reach each benchmark, then he or she is out of SAP. Students who do not maintain SAP are notified and put on academic probation. A student on academic probation meets with student services staff and together, they develop a plan for improving the student’s performance at the institution. Students may appeal their status.

SAP Appeals and Probation

Appeals

Students may appeal if unusual and/or mitigating circumstances affected academic progress. Such circumstances may include a severe illness or injury to the student or an immediate family member, the death of a student’s relative, student military service activation or other circumstances as deemed appropriate for consideration by the Dean.

To appeal, the student must submit a letter and supporting documentation to the Dean. These must explain in detail why the student failed to meet the minimum academic standards, what unusual and/or mitigating circumstances contributed to the failure, and how their situation has changed to allow the student to meet SAP requirements by the next calculation.

Submit appeals to the SAP Appeals Committee care of: registrar@woodmontcollege.edu Appeals are reviewed within 15 working days of receipt of all required documentation. Students will be notified by email if the above timeframe is revised during peak processing times.

Academic Probation

  • A student who does not maintain a 2.0 cumulative grade point average (CGPA) annually will be placed on academic probation for the next term.
  • The student must meet with student services staff to create a plan for improving the student’s performance at the institution.
  • Students will be evaluated at the mid-term and end of term to assess progress.
  • Students meeting the standards for satisfactory academic progress at the end of the probationary term will return to satisfactory status.
  • Students who do not meet the standards for satisfactory academic progress at the end of the probationary term must meet with student services personnel again in order to modify their academic plan.
  • Students may be withdrawn from the institution if they do not improve for two semesters. They may be withdrawn for lack of progress through the program.
  • Students have the right to appeal any decision for withdrawal.

Academic Dismissal

  • At the end of probation, a student must have brought his or her grade point average to a CGPA of 2.0. If this does not occur, the student may be dismissed from Woodmont College.
  • The student has a right to appeal the decision to the school director. The appeal should be submitted in writing within one week of the dismissal.

Academic Probation

  • A student who does not maintain a 2.0 cumulative grade point average (CGPA) or drops below 1.5 GPA for any term will be placed on academic probation for the next term.
  • The student will also be given extra assistance in an effort to reach the expected level of performance.
  • Students will be evaluated at the mid-term and end of term to assess progress.
  • Students meeting the standards for satisfactory academic progress at the end of the probationary term will return to satisfactory status.
  • Students who do not meet the standards for satisfactory academic progress at the end of the probationary term are withdrawn.
  • Students have the right to appeal any decision for withdrawal.

Dismissal

Unprofessional conduct, which might discredit the school, will be subject to dismissal of the student. The school reserves the right to terminate a student as follows:

  • A student placed on Probation who fails to meet the Standards and Requirements set forth by the school and agreed to by the student will be dismissed.
  • Students who are terminated for Academic, Attendance, or Conduct reasons as defined in this Catalog will not receive a refund of tuition monies paid.

Academic Dismissal

  • At the end of probation, a student must have brought his/her grade point average to a CGPA of 2.0. If this does not occur, the student will be dismissed from Woodmont College.
  • The student has a right to appeal the decision to the school director. The appeal should be submitted in writing within one week of the dismissal.

Woodmont College Statement of Ethics

The goal of higher education is to promote knowledge and to help students attain their deeply held aspirations. To accomplish these goals, ethical conduct and consideration of others is required.

Violations

At Woodmont College, we expect our student body maintain a strong honor code throughout their academic career at the college. This honor code begins from the very outset of their engagement with Woodmont College. Falsifying information on admission documents will be classified as a violation of the integrity policy. All forms of academic dishonesty such as cheating, plagiarism, and misrepresentation are violations of academic integrity standards.

Definitions

Cheating includes copying from another’s work, or exam. Violations include facilitating cheating by divulging exam information to other students for them to cheat.
Plagiarism refers to the presenting work of another as one’s own i.e. not attributing the idea or statement to the rightful author. Any source which a student uses in an assignment, whether in a paper or even in a discussion post, must be properly cited. This includes electronic sources as well. Plagiarism includes submitting the same assignment to two teachers. Professors will be using Plagiarism checking technology such as PlagTracker.com or Plagiarisma.net to check student work and detect plagiarism.
Misrepresentation includes forgery of official academic documents, as well as presenting oneself as another student for the purposes of completing an assignment or taking an exam for another student. Work submitted must be completed by the student who submits the assignments, posts on the discussion board or hands in an exam.

DISCUSSING, REPORTING AND ADJUDICATING VIOLATIONS

Any form of academic dishonesty or inappropriate conduct that a faculty member discovers must be reported in directly to the Dean and will result in penalties ranging from a personal warning to dismissal from the College, depending on the nature and severity of the infraction. In the case of a first offense, faculty members have the option to allow students to re-do an assignment with a grade penalty. After a second infraction, the student will be placed on Academic Probation or dismissed from the College.

Grounds for Dismissal

  • Insufficient progress
  • Academic matters
  • Attendance
  • Failure to pay tuition fees
  • Failure to adhere to the Student Conduct Policy
  • Students who are terminated for failure to pay tuition fees as defined in catalog will not receive a refund of tuition paid
  • Students terminated for violation of the Student Conduct Policy as defined in the catalog will not receive a refund of tuition paid.

Graduation Requirements

A student enrolled in a bachelor’s degree program must declare his/her chosen major by the end of his/her sophomore year. A student enrolled in an associate’s degree program must declare his/her chosen major by the end of his/her third term at the college. During this time students are advised to take general education courses common to all programs. At the time a major is declared, each student will meet with a member of the administration to go over the courses already taken and plan out the course of study until graduation. Once a student feels s/he is ready to graduate, s/he must meet with a member of the administration again to go over his/her records to verify all requirements for graduation have been met. Once the student has met all requirements, s/he receives a signed form from the administrator declaring that s/he is eligible to graduate. This form will be submitted to the Bursar, who will confirm that the student does not owe any money to the college. The form is then submitted to office of the registrar, who will complete the necessary documents and diploma for graduation. To qualify for graduation, the student must have a minimum of 2.0 GPA overall.

Credit for Previous Education, Training, and Examinations

Students who have completed coursework at a different institution may submit a request to transfer credit. Transfer credit can be used to satisfy either a major or general education requirement or elective. To request transfer credit the following conditions must be met:

The final grade posted for each potential transfer course is a ‘C’ grade (or better).

Transfer credit is applied to lower-level courses.

The course work does not duplicate or overlap previous work.

No more than 90 credits for work done elsewhere may be counted toward a bachelor’s degree at Woodmont College, and no more than 45 credits for work done elsewhere may be counted towards an associate’s degree at Woodmont College.

Credit must originate from an institution that is accredited by an association recognized by the U.S. Department of Education. Transcripts from International Schools must be accompanied by proof of official recognition. Judaic Studies courses may be transferred from faith-based institutions such as Yeshivot and seminaries.

In order for approved transfer credit to be awarded, students must submit an official transcript that clearly indicates all of the following information for each course:

#

Course codes or numbers

Course titles or descriptions

Credit hour calculation

%

Final grades earned

Course credits earned

The official transcript should be submitted along with a Transfer Credit Request Form Coursework will only be evaluated for transfer credit once the student has registered at Woodmont College.

Faith-based (Yeshiva and Seminary) Program Credit Transfer:
Woodmont College’s extensive familiarity with Jewish faith-based programs provides the opportunity for students to transfer Judaic Studies credits ONLY from faith-based programs. These faith-based programs maintain a very rigorous schedule of study, where students often learn for 12 hours daily.

Language

Literature

Law

History

Philosophy

Ethics

Religion

Bible

Talmud

Tradition

Course Descriptions or Syllabi may be requested (Certain course titles are self-explanatory, such as Laws of Shabbos, but others may require submission of their course description to be validated.)

The official transcript should be submitted along with a Transfer Credit Request Form.
Coursework will only be evaluated for transfer credit once the student has registered at Woodmont College.

Exams:

Woodmont College accepts proficiency exams for transfer credit. These include but are not limited to:

  • Advanced Placement
  • ALEKS
  • DANTES
  • CLEP
  • StraighterLine
  • Sophia
  • NCCRS credit recommendation

Up to 25% of a student’s degree may be earned through proficiency examinations.

Applicants desiring to “place out” of any given course may take a placement exam, with the Dean’s approval. Students will not receive credit but may gain exemption from prerequisites.

Procedure for Transferring Credits:

To transfer credit, students should:

  • Submit Official Transcripts
  • Complete the Transfer Credit Request Form
  • Pay one-time $50 Official Credit Evaluation fee

Official transcripts can be submitted in either of the following methods:

  • E-transcripts – send to registrar@woodmontcollege.edu
  • Sealed paper transcripts – deliver in-person or via mail to the Woodmont College address: 16375 N.E. 18th Avenue, Suite 304 North Miami Beach, FL 33162 Phone: (305) 944-0035 Fax: (305) 944-0335

Students may be required to submit course descriptions or syllabi to complete the transfer credit process.

For Students requesting a transcript from an international school:

Students are encouraged to purchase a third-party, course-by-course international transcript translation and evaluation service. Some examples of these services are:

Unofficial transcripts and all application documents must be received before class registration. Official transcripts must be submitted in order for an official credit evaluation to take place.

The transferability of Woodmont College credits is solely at the discretion of the receiving institution. It is each student’s responsibility to confirm whether credits will be accepted by another institution.

Woodmont College will accept credits that meet the school’s standards. 

Students may transfer credits earned at and transferred from other postsecondary institutions, when congruent and applicable to the Woodmont College program, and when validated and confirmed by Woodmont College. Official transcripts should be sent directly from the transferring institution. 

Credits can also be earned upon successful completion of challenge examinations or standardized tests demonstrating learning at the credential level in specific subject matter areas. Proficiency exams are limited to 25% of the degree. English Composition 101 may not be transferred in through a proficiency exam.

Up to 65% of a program’s credits can be transferred from other institutions to Woodmont College. Up to 49% of major requirements and 49% of general education requirements can be transferred from other institutions. 
 
More details on the Woodmont College Transfer Credit Policy can be found here:  https:/woodmontcollege.edu/transfer-credits

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